At the gateway to Britanny

Something for all the senses

In 2010 the Saint James area joined forces with several other areas, - in Brittany, Normandy, Maine, Anjou and Poitou-, all located at the geographical limits of their provinces, to form a group of « gateway » destinations, recognised by UNESCO as part of Worldwide Heritage.

Le Tronçon, a river between Normandy and Brittany
Le Tronçon, a river between Normandy and Brittany

 

The River Tronçon cuts a swathe through both Normandy and Brittany. Over the years, Saint-James has been much influenced by the areas surrounding it, both Norman and Breton.  Granite from Louvigné du Désert in Brittany, for instance, was used for much of the construction across the canton.  The geographic location of Saint-James, initially a military stronghold, has made it the centre of Breton-Norman interaction across the centuries.  Today’s local fêtes preserve some of the traditional exchanges, such as the Normandy versus Brittany quoit throwing competition at Montjoie Saint Martin’s Apple and Chestnut fête, which is held every year to celebrate the first cider pressings. 

Today’s world-famous brand Tricots Saint-James belongs to the town’s tradition of clothes manufacturing,  a tradition which dates back to the Middle Ages, when there was already significant commercial activity  across local and national boundaries. The famous sailor’s jersey was worn by navigators setting sail from Saint-Malo for England as well as for other countries.    

 

Granite from Brittany

cloché de villiers
cloché de villiers
eglise d'argouges
eglise d'argouges
eglise d'argouges
eglise d'argouges
bois mainfray
bois mainfray
Détail facade en granit
Détail facade en granit

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